Author Topic: Rustling up some galaxies at the ranch  (Read 980 times)

mccarthymark

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Rustling up some galaxies at the ranch
« on: April 04, 2017, 10:52:57 PM »
Getting out on a Tuesday night was rather a necessity to cure my photon deprivation.  I didn’t mind the resulting sleep deprivation, even at work the next day.  A great variety of objects seen, the ones which left the greatest impression here:

Stone 61, Double star in Pyxis.  Pretty blue and orange pair, PA to south; close but well split, I’d guess 5-6”.  Can't find any online references for this, even in Stelle Doppie.  Close to Minkowsky 3-6 (which showed as a very small green orb with OIII). 

NGC 2818/A, OC and PN in Pyxis: Cluster is large and loose with wide range of brightness; 12 brighter stars scattered over a mist of fainter; moderately rich.  People complain the cluster is too sparse and not detached, but it seemed pretty well detached to me.  The planetary is on the western edge of the cluster and is a foreground object.  No central star, it is rather large with a diffuse halo and slightly out of round N-S.  The halo brightens on the southern rim, and a little less bright brightening on the SW side.   Seeing did not support higher than 205x.

IC 2469: Sc Spiral: 4 degrees north of 2818, a long edge on, large, pretty bright, 12b mag.  Small round nucleus, less bright round and prominent core, with a long halo 4:1 NE-SW which averted vision brightens and lengthens, especially to the north.  Southern extension is shorter and dimmer.  Star in middle of southern arm.  John Herschel missed this one during his South African foray; was discovered by Lewis Swift in 1897.  It's very strange: the image of this galaxy in Aladin doesn't show any other galaxies, even faint ones, nearby; IC 2469 is big, bright, and on its own. 

NGC 2784: Very bright stellar nucleus, bright oval core and long 5:1 E-W faint halo with hints of spiral and is twisted – like the blur of a coin spinning to rest on a table.  Star at the northern tip.

NGC 3132 Eight burst nebula, PN in Vela: Bright central star, oval NE-SW halo with a soft edge, darker central ring around the central star.  OIII gives an impression of spiraling turbulence in the brightened halo.  NBP filter has a better view, with a brighter CS and shows the same halo swirl, which may be brighter sections of an inner ring with a diffuse halo surrounding it.

NGC 3495: Large, lovely tilted spiral.  Strong impression of spiral arms.  Sharp cut-off edge on the east side; the west side of the halo is larger.  Slowly brightening to the middle, to a small bright nucleus.  4:1 NNE-SSW.

Hydra I Cluster / AGC 1060: Steve was working on the Hydra I Cluster and invited me to join with my scope.  He pointed out the 5th magnitude star at the center of the cluster.  If one finds the cup of Crater and follows a straight line through the cup and its holder, there are two bright stars -- the star to the NE is the one to aim at.  Boom! Galaxies everywhere!  I followed the detail chart in my Interstellarum and could find every object I tried.  NGC 3311 / 3309 dominate the space between the two bright stars in the center of the cluster; 3311 had a bright core with a mottled halo, likely spiral, and 3309 was a fairly bright elliptical.  A much fainter and smaller NGC 3307 lay to the west.  They form a string with smaller and fainter NGC 3312, and NGC 3314 and its excessively faint and small companion A.  Off to the east was NGC 3316-1, a relatively bright and large patch.  Steve called out instructions for finding some excessively faint ESOs which were not plotted on the chart, 501-47 & 501-49, which were mere small smudges seen with averted vision only.  One really has to work to find such objects.  I scanned about in the 1 degree circle around this main group, and found a few more NGCs and ESOs and ICs.  The most interesting one was IC 2597, which seemed to be an interacting pair with a smaller galaxy to its south, which I find on Aladin is ESO 501-59; I had the impression that the halos were somehow touching, but this was illusory as the gap in redshifts is too large; likely just overlapping in line of sight.  To really explore these clusters I need larger scale charts but especially a scope that will track, since it was distracting to bump the scope along with the sky, and limited the power I could apply.
 
NGC 3162: Nice!  Obviously a face on spiral, though small and fairly faint.  Stellar nucleus.  Brighter on the southern rim, which must be an arm.

NGC 3227 / Group: Bright, large, NW-SE 5:2, with a bright core and very small / stellar nucleus.  Mottling in the halo hints of spiral.  Its NE tip touches NGC 3226 on the outer edge of that galaxy's core.  3226 is fainter but about as large and also with a bright core and stellar nucleus, SSW-NNE, 3:2.  Very striking scene.  NGC 3222 is to the west on edge of FOV, faint, small and round.

Arp 291 = UGC 5832 & CGCG 65-90. Pretty faint irregular oval, pops with averted vision. Asymmetrical shape; some brightening glow within the halo with averted vision.  It is a closely paired double galaxy which Arp classified as having "wind effects."

NGC 3501: Very long and thin edge on; 6:1 or more, SSW-NNE.  Faint but brightens and shows a twisted halo with averted vision.  Another galaxy, NGC 3507, faint and round, close to the NE.

Arp 191 = UGC 6175A & B (MCG+3-28-63): Arp classified as "Narrow filaments."  Two glows next to each other, very faint and small, no detail.

NGC 3666: Nice edge on, brightens greatly with averted vision.  Large uniform oval core, no nucleus, long diffuse edges.  Bright star to NE, and a second fainter star very close to W tip.  E-W 4:1.

NGC 3705: Stellar nucleus, very small bright core, diffuse halo.  No end to it; 5:1 NW-SE.  Looks like it has a double nucleus? 
 
NGC 4742: Small intense stellar nucleus and a very faint & diffuse halo elongated 3:2 E-W.  Pretty bright and small.  To the SE is yellow & blue double star STF 1682, which made a wonderful sight with the galaxy.

My last object was M3, found by Telrad and memory.  Enormous, bright, very well resolved with tiny points for stars; many yellow and red stars seen.  Isn't it a kicker, than my mirror settles down just when I'm too tired to continue.  It was 3am and time to sleep.
Mark

Marko

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Re: Rustling up some galaxies at the ranch
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2017, 11:19:29 PM »
The AGC1060 area is dense for sure.  Apparently I have not really revisited it since a fine night at the same place back in 3-28-2009 and yes ... Steve was there to round out the group of 6 observers.    That was a project at the time with 17 members of the cluster logged in my 18" that night which included ESO 501-47 but curious enough I work from MegaStar made charts that show ESO 501-49 so it's odd I did not mention it (although I have the recording if I dare to check ...  LOL)

After that I did quite a study on a favorite area I call the Ngc3158 group and picked out 13 from that group which I only mention because there are up to mag 16 galaxies noted in that yet i did not note the mag 15 ESO 501-49.  It was only 10:30 for AGC1060 so I cannot blame delirium brought on by sleep deprivation.   

Ah yes, burn that M3 into the eyes prior to sleeptime.  Good one.

Great notes Mark, its encouraging enough to lead me to those areas next time out.   

Thanks for Sharing
Marko

Let me roam the deep skies and I'll be content.

sgottlieb

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Re: Rustling up some galaxies at the ranch
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2017, 11:13:00 AM »
Great report, McMark!  Fun to relive the night.

Your comment about NGC 3705 appearing to have a double nucleus piqued my interest as I've been making NGC galaxies with double nuclei (post-merger coalesced pairs) an observing project.  I've attached the SDSS image -- it turns out you noticed a very faint star just northwest (upper right) of the nucleus.  Nice catch.

I also wanted to mention that IC 2597 is also the brightest galaxy in the Hickson 48 quartet.  This is another one that was John Herschel overlooked in his sweeps.  Since he found all the other bright galaxies in the cluster (including much fainter NGC 3307), it's surprising he didn't catch this one, but it was probably just outside the limits of the sweep.  Lewis Swift was credited with the discovery in 1898 from Mt. Lowe (near Mt Wilson in the San Gabriel mountains), but actually E.E. Barnard discovered it 8 years earlier with a 12-inch refractor at Lick.  Barnard didn't measure an accurate position or publish the discovery, but it's right there in his notebooks.  I had seen ESO 501-59 previously (HCG 48B) as well as 16th magnitude HCG 48C, but this is the first time I glimpsed the faintest member HCG 48D (B = 17.0, V = 16.0).  Not bad for -27° declination.

mccarthymark

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Re: Rustling up some galaxies at the ranch
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2017, 12:49:23 PM »
Isn't that funny.  I was looking at IC 2597 & (unplotted) ESO 501-59 in my scope before we looked at Hickson 48 in your scope a few minutes later.  It wasn't identified as a Hickson in Interstellaum, so I didn't pull out my Hickson finder until we were trying to see it in your scope.  With your larger aperture and higher magnification it looked different enough that I didn't recognize it. 

Now I'll have to go back and see if I can bag (c) and (d) in mine. 
Mark

sgottlieb

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Re: Rustling up some galaxies at the ranch
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2017, 04:43:10 PM »
Must have something to do with our focusers being on opposite sides of the scope  ;D

Hickson 48 is one of those oddball cases of a supposedly isolated group (one of Hickson's criteria) being situated not far from the central region of a moderately rich cluster.  Maybe he made an exception to reach an even 100 groups.