Author Topic: Aug 16th sun and why Calcium K  (Read 1535 times)

mpacker

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Aug 16th sun and why Calcium K
« on: August 17, 2014, 04:01:00 AM »
I took out today the 80mm Lunt and 80mm TMB (Hershel Wedge and narrow band green filter). I always check out, and close out viewing H-alpha in my short 15mim observing sessions as filamentary structures in H-alpha flares occasionally change over the course minutes.

OK so H-flares were all around the solar disc today. Fine. I have seen many spectacular flares over the course of the 2013-2014 max. But if this was my first time viewing the sun in H-alpha I'd be sayin' "Wow" like Leeloo stepping on board Fhloston Paradise cruise ship. I estimated 79 Sunspots which tallies with International SN estimate of 74. NOAA usually ranks in higher and it was with a count 119.

What was cool about these sunspots is that the they were in pairs AND the South pairs diagonally lagged but paired-up with the pairs in the Northern hemisphere. A classic visualization revealing the connection between the Northern and Southern solar dynamos.

I could be called odd. But I am looking forward to solar minimum! :) Some things are learned best seeing the yin and yang.  Also its a chance to observe active regions of a "quiet" sun where there may be no sunspots but the faculea, plage and solar granules abound. Sky and Telescope recently put out a nice article on the quiet sun:

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/observing-news/how-to-see-solar-faculae-072320143/

And as pointed out, although standard filters and H-alpha show "active regions" do a degree - Calcium K filters open up the door and lay bare solar activity everyday whether there happens to be a lot of prominences (or not) or there happens to be a lot of sunspots (or not). All the cracks between convective cells or granules are reveled as a network.







Mag -26.74
Packer